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Holidaymakers wishing to immerse themselves in Ireland’s ancient history are advised to pay the Aran Islands a visit. The three unspoilt gems lying off the country’s West coast provide an enchanting snapshot into the past. Travellers can access the popular beauty spots via ports located in Galway City, which can be reached by road from the country’s international travel hubs.

Visitors keen on enjoying the varied landscape from the comfort of a vehicle can contact car hire Ireland prior to their visit. Once travellers arrive in Galway, on the West coast, they have the option to take a ferry or short flight to the stunning Aran Islands. Remnants of stone age living are preserved on the all three of the islands, which are called Inis Mor, Inis Meain and Inis Oirr.

Inis Mor, the largest of the group, is home to a wedge tomb believed to be over 4,000 years old and is popular with visitors. In addition, the island also boasts a collection of Iron Age forts including Dún Aonghasa, which towers above the sea. Other historical attractions on Inis Mor include Teaghlach Éinne, also known as St Enda’s Household, and consists of the remains of an 8 th Century church that is thought to be the location of one of the first monasteries in the country. Visitors may like to continue on to Teampall Bheanáin church and take photos of the 7 th century construction that is thought to be the smallest chapel in Ireland.

Moving on to the second largest island Inis Meain, travellers can further quench their thirst for history by visiting its pre-Christian fort Dún Chonchúir and the uniquely shaped Dún Fearbhaí. Unlike several of the area’s round or oval forts, Dún Fearbhaí is more rectangular in shape.

White sand and a charming fishing village greet tourists who make a trip to the smallest island Inis Oirr, which many choose to navigate by foot or bike, in order to appreciate the impressive views, including the Cliffs of Mohar across the bay. History fans can take a stroll toward O’Brien’s castle which is located in a stone fort and dominates the landscape from its hilltop positions. The construction was erected in the 1500s by past rulers of the area.

Once visitors have completed their historic tour of the Aran Islands they may like to indulge in the gem’s modern comforts and food offered by the high quality accommodation and cafes located in the region.

 

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